LEADING THE WAY OUT OF THE EU

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Friday 22 June 2018

Will this go down as the week the Tory traitors lost their nerve and Britain’s onward path to independence was settled? Time will tell. Certainly, following the defeat of Dominic Grieve’s notorious amendment and the swift passage of the EU Withdrawal Bill, the prospects of a good Brexit deal look that little bit brighter.

But this is no time to rejoice. The Remainer infested House of Commons will still get a vote at the eleventh hour. Following the amendment’s 319-303 defeat in the Commons, the airwaves were saturated with speculation the ballot will be vulnerable to amendments rather than a simple choice between deal or no-deal. Instead, a Remainer jamboree: second referendum, extending the negotiating period, untriggering Article 50. You name it. Jacob Rees-Mogg assures us it’s impossible. Check the Leave.EU blog for our assessment.

The Withdrawal Bill now awaits Royal Assent after the House of Lords gave up on their sabotage. But Parliament’s numerous fifth columnists will soon be splicing Single Market membership into the Customs Bill, which returns to the Commons shortly.

Speaking of fifth columnists, on Wednesday the European Parliament’s Brexit spokesperson, Guy Verhofstadt – who recently attacked our chairman Arron Banks and Nigel Farage – delivered a long-winded performance before the Commons Brexit committee.

“I don’t think the system is as sustainable in the EU as it exists today. It has to be reformed. In my opinion a federal sense is the only way it can work,” the Eurofanatic told the select committee – watch the clip hereChallenged on his assertion that “rules are rules” by Rees-Mogg, when the EU has a track record of bending them to oblivion, Verhofstadt could only blabber. The man’s a fraud.

The former Belgian prime minister had been in London to lecture on the lack of assurances given to EU nationals residing in Britain, which appeared to prompt the Home Office to publish a set of proposals. “3.8m EU migrants allowed to stay here – 600,000 more than estimated and they can bring their families,” reads the front page of today’s Daily Mail, “£65 (and three questions) for EU to live here” says sister paper Metro on its front page.

Unsurprisingly, EU countries have done nothing in reply. Another foolish concession, sacrificed for no benefit.

This was only the second sin committed by the Home Secretary over the past seven days.

The week began with the government for once recognising the benefits of independence. The Brexit dividend will be splashed on the NHS, it was announced. Typically, the Remainer-led media disputed the stats, detracting attention from Sajid Javid’s scandalous decision to loosen immigration controls.

Foreign students – many of whom are unable to speak English and “study” for phoney for diplomas – will not be counted among the tens-of-thousands target. This spells only more pressure on the NHS. It’s all very well pumping in more money at one end, but if we’re not diligent in restricting access to healthcare billions of pounds more will be wasted.

The other taxpayer scandal of the week was the revelation that Rwanda’s ruthless dictator Paul Kagame has received more than £1bn in British aid, £25m of which has been re-routed back to London to sponsor foreign-owned Arsenal Football Club. International Trade Secretary Penny Mordaunt has vowed to spend her outrageous £14bn budget more wisely. We’ve heard it all before.

Last week, our chairman made a heartfelt appeal for assistance in the battles we face on two fronts: one to fulfill the will of the 17.4m, another repelling waves of attacks from encircling enemies of independence whether they be Verhofstadt, his allies in the House of Commons like Ben Bradshaw or the not-so-neutral Electoral Commission.

Cast an eye on the continent and it is the establishment in retreat. Angela Merkel is surrounded by hostiles as her administration and the rest of the EU prepare for next week’s summit, where European leaders will attempt to bash out a new compromise over the immigration crisis – who registers them and where they go – a problem created and aggravated by Mrs Merkel herself.

“One decision has completely ruined her career and her legacy. And it was, I think, the worst decision any Western leader has taken in modern times,” Nigel Farage told Fox News.

“In the last 4 years over 1,000 people in Europe killed or maimed by refugees,” he added.

Italy hero Matteo Salvini had already raised the pressure on Berlin, now the German Chancellor is facing dissent from powerful figures within her own ranks. Horst Seehofer, the leader of the sister CSU party has joined Salvini in taking a hard line on immigration. This week he was reported as saying about Merkel, “I cannot work with the woman anymore.” Her already shaky coalition is now on the verge of collapse.

With Merkel gone, only Macron will be left to speak up for the madness of European integration, and he will face heated opposition from the leaders of Austria, Poland and Hungary, to name but a few. Incidentally, next week Austria will take over leadership of the EU’s policy agenda. The Austrians intend to clamp down further on immigration. This could get very interesting.

Tomorrow we celebrate the two year anniversary of the referendum. Even if our own leaders refuse to forge the Brexit we asked for, a new Europe may well hand it to us anyway. We should take the advice of US Ambassador Woody Johnson, who yesterday said “this defeatist attitude towards Brexit is a bit startling to me”, and suggested that our leaders should have a “positive attitude towards the future.” Quite right.